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Racial Disparities Still Prevalent in Schools

racial-disparity

Racial Disparities Still Prevalent in Schools

Despite efforts to level the playing field for all students, racial disparities are still very much a part of some schools.

According to a report released by the U.S. Department of Education in July, African-American and Latino students are behind in opportunities offered and more likely to be suspended from school. The Civil Rights Data Collection survey is conducted biennially, with the latest report surveying 50 million students in 95,000 schools during the 2013-2014 school year.

One area of the study revealed that schools with a high number of black and Latino students were less likely to offer advanced classes in math and science. Just 33% of high schools with high black and Latino student enrollment offer calculus, compared to 56% of high schools with low black and Latino student enrollment. Only 48% of high schools with high black and Latino student enrollment offer physics, compared to 67% of high schools with low black and Latino student enrollment.

Minority students are more likely to be suspended than their white peers. In kindergarten through 12th grade, black students were 3.8 times more likely to be suspended than white students.

The disparity “tears at the moral fabric of our nation,” Education Secretary John B. King Jr. told reporters.
“What sets the U.S. apart from any other country is the idea that opportunity is universal. These data show that we still fall far short of that ideal.”

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